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Best practice cybersecurity for an evolving business landscape

Cillian McCarthy, chief executive officer, Paradyn: the company provides organisations with a 360-degree assessment of the gaps in their IT infrastructure, systems and processes

CIS Controls provide actionable steps to optimise cybersecurity for organisations of all sizes

 
As cyberthreats become increasingly sophisticated in a hybrid-working world, organisations cannot afford to be complacent about their cybersecurity strategies. CIS Controls are the globally accepted benchmark for cyber defence, providing specific and actionable ways to stop today’s most pervasive and dangerous attacks.

This recommended set of steps helps to optimise your cybersecurity landscape, ensures compliance and gives more control over your organisation’s systems. The controls are regularly monitored and updated to keep pace with the rapidly changing cybersecurity ecosystem.

Proactive approach to cybersecurity challenges

 
By using a highly proactive and collaborative approach, Paradyn is helping organisations of all sizes to implement these actions in order to protect their customers and the way they interact with stakeholders.

Paradyn provides organisations with a 360-degree assessment of the gaps in their IT infrastructure, systems and processes, reviewing the entire estate against the 170+ CIS Controls. Its security experts then recommend a tailored implementation and remediation plan.

From malware, email and web security to employee awareness training and penetration testing, the controls help to protect organisations against cyberattacks while aiding regulatory compliance with measures such as GDPR.

CIS Controls can also help to inform management objectives, prioritising areas that need attention and creating better ways of working and engaging with employees and stakeholders.

As security challenges evolve, so do the best practices to meet them. CIS Controls enable organisations to deal with new challenges and act as a guide to benchmark against peers. They can also provide a holistic framework to secure existing and planned business assets and resources, no matter how complex.

Click here to discuss your cybersecurity requirements in more detail.

Paradyn commits to being carbon-neutral by 2030 as part of Techies Go Green movement

Dublin, 21 September 2022 – – Paradyn, one of Ireland’s leading cybersecurity service providers, is today announcing that it has joined Techies Go Green, a movement of IT and tech-oriented companies who are committed to decarbonising their businesses.
It joins the community of organisations who are aiming to become carbon-neutral by 2030 at the latest.

Techies Go Green enables each member to purposefully improve their energy efficiency by collaborating and sharing practical know-how. Started by IT distributor DataSolutions, more than 200 companies have signed up to the initiative to date.

Cillian McCarthy, CEO of Paradyn said: “We are delighted to join the Techies Go Green movement, underscoring our commitment to a sustainable future. It’s a vital initiative which not only builds climate awareness but points to actionable solutions to the challenges we face. These challenges need to be addressed through collective action and we look forward to working closely with the team at Techies Go Green and our industry peers on our journey to net-zero.”

Michael O’Hara, Techies Go Green co-founder said: “We are delighted that Paradyn has joined Techies Go Green – an important initiative which aims to benefit companies, people and the planet.
“It is vital that every business takes responsibility, sets targets and reduces their environmental impact on the earth. Techies Go Green is designed to support this, share ideas and make a sustainable difference.” To learn more about or become a signatory with Techies Go Green, visit www.techiesgogreen.com.

About Paradyn
At Paradyn, we build strategic partnerships with our clients. Our clients benefit through our security-first approach from best-practice consultancy of their entire IT estate right through to implementation, monitoring and ongoing support. Our team of highly trained network and security consultants deliver best-in-class advice and support so our customers can reduce cyber risk and focus on delivering their core business activities. www.paradyn.ie

About Techies Go Green
Techies Go Green is a movement of IT and tech-oriented companies who are committed to decarbonising their businesses and becoming green and verifiably sustainable. Founded by DataSolutions and with more than 200 businesses signed up to date, its aim is to enable each member to purposefully improve their energy efficiency by collaborating and sharing practical know-how and committing to becoming carbon neutral by 2030 at the latest. https://www.techiesgogreen.com

5 Reasons To Switch Backup

Introduction

By now, our worlds have been completely flipped upside down. But one thing remains the same. Most legacy backup solutions in the market today…well… aren’t very good. Spending too much effort on backup, IT admins lack the time, resources and simply the energy to proactively tackle the real business challenges are holding businesses back and slowing them down. The frustration is real, people!

Here’s some data to prove the point. Between September and December 2020, an independent research company asked 3,000 IT pros from 28 countries about their backup and it turned out that only 63% of backups completed on time without errors and 33% of all restore jobs/tasks fail to be successful. Leaves a bad taste in your mouth, doesn’t it?

These days, IT needs to think not one, but several steps ahead. Taking ransomware, vendor lock-in, storage capacity, cloud mobility, as well as unpredictable world economical and health factors into the equation.

To add a cherry on top, the events of 2020 and now 2021 have compounded these pressures like a match to a tinderbox. From the explosion of remote working, to the increasing sophistication of security attacks, data protection needs to be a priority. Don’t settle for “meh”. You can’t afford to put it off any longer.

If you’re reading this, you can probably attest to some, or maybe even all, of the above. This means you’re likely a victim, I mean customer, of one of those mediocre backup solutions.

It’s OK. Know this: you’re not alone. IT pros around the globe are feeling your pain! This quick read is designed to help you understand the why and when.

Then, the ball is in your court to determine the how.

List Of The 5 Reasons

Here is what 1,500 IT pros from around the globe had to say when asked this simple research question:

Another very interesting data point from this question:

Only 2% of respondents claimed, “nothing would drive my organization to change its primary backup solution to a new solution or service”. If 98% of IT pros having a reason to switch doesn’t scream a lack of trust, loyalty and confidence in their current provider, nothing else could!

Reason #1

My current backup is unreliable.

The most popular reason to switch primary backup solutions is reliability or, a lack thereof. This comes from taking 20-year-old code (or even 30 if you can believe it) and attempting to retrofit it for the IT challenges of today. It’s the equivalent of the Winnebago in Spaceballs. Absolutely ridiculous. (If you’re too you ng to get that joke, Google it, then watch it. That movie is great. And may the Schwartz be with you!)

In addition, dedupe databases often become error prone and can cause complete data loss. Many solutions lack data recovery verification, or only provide this availability for limited platforms (for example, VMware only). Another issue is simply visibility into what is working and what’s not. All too often, IT admins only find out there’s an issue when it’s too late. It’s like discovering a leak in your roof in the middle of a monsoon. Not good.

Many companies chalk this up to lack of training or skills. This is untrue. If a backup solution is stable, reliable and easy to use, then you shouldn’t need a PhD to work it. In addition, many IT pros avoid testing due many reasons, but a modern solution can test your backups on schedule in an isolated virtual network.

What you should expect from your next backup solution is peace of mind, and a “set it and forget it” type of confidence. You deserve a solution that’s got your back. Plus, imagine actually knowing that you can restore when needed.

Reason #2

Once you add everything up, it costs a lot.

When considering the cost of data protection, it’s easy to focus on the traditional costs — hardware, software and storage. Some hardware costs can come at a premium when you’re locked-in, and your software isn’t flexible enough to handle alternatives. Many software solutions include add-ons, secondary components or ongoing services so make sure nothing is excluded from your calculation. For storage costs, we all know someone who has been burned with hidden charges and data reduction promises that never quite come to fruition. The days of simply pointing to a target are over. You need to find the right balance between performance and cost efficiency, and the recovery SLAs you’re comfortable with for the cost. Without any “gotchas”. Those are the worst.

Don’t forget the less tangible, often forgotten costs. The cost of downtime and data loss. In addition, impacts that downtime and data loss can have on your relationship with your customers or damage to brand integrity can be quite impactful. The time, effort and resource costs to not only maintain your backup infrastructure, but also to get ramped up, trained and running at full capacity. Another cost is lost productivity. Few things are more frustrating to an IT pro than when they are wasting time and energy reacting to data protection issues, opposed to proactively working on other important project.

What you should expect from your next backup solution is a simple, yet flexible cost model; where you can use the hardware and storage you want, that can snap in with the software solution you like. You should also be able to make a change in your own environment without setting off a domino-effect nightmare that results in you having to cancel your weekend plans to clean up the mess. This restriction also prohibits your use of modern technologies which perpetuates a long-term effect of reduced efficiency.

Reason #3

That ROI never became a reality.

We’ve all been promised software could do something only to later find out that it couldn’t. Now you’re juggling multiple solutions to cover certain aspects of your environment, or that path to simplicity just became more complex. That ROI calculator you were promised drifted away just like Homer Simpson disappearing into the bushes taking your confidence, budget and reputation with him.

Another ROI consideration for your benefit is data re-use. All data protection solutions encapsulate a great deal of data. In today’s ecosystem, data is power, and the right ROI calculation isn’t simply crunching the numbers of time saved versus money invested, but the value provided by putting your data to work.

What you should expect from your next backup solution (and those that are selling it) is the principle to “under promise and over deliver”. No Sales Engineer demo magic tricks. A software-defined trial experience with YOU in the driver’s seat, available immediately without waiting on an appliance to be delivered and a Systems Engineer to configure it. Maybe you can even find a solution to help you tap into the power of the data gold mine that you’re sitting on. Like adding marshmallow fluff to your peanut butter and banana
sandwich, that extra layer makes all the difference.

Reason #4

My recovery times are slow, and backup windows are long.

Some backup vendors might try to wow you with an example, but when you dig into product breadth — backup configurations, architectural flexibility, snapshot integrations, replication capabilities — reality sets in. It takes time, years really, to build the required breadth.

Another key factor is recovery speeds and flexibility. Often, it’s not a story of if you can recover, but how easily and quickly can you do it. Count the number of clicks it takes you to recover something simply, they may surprise you. Many solutions either lack the granularity for specific recoveries, or the scalability for bulk restores.

But let’s think bigger — what if you can’t tolerate even a few minutes of data being lost in the shortest of backup windows? You need the big guns — continuous data protection (CDP). Many would agree that it’s the best when it comes built-in with your existing backup solution, operating replicas natively from the same console. However, some vendors still separate CDP as a separately priced product or specialize exclusively on CDP, making you couple it with another product for more regular backup needs.

What you should expect from your next backup solution is a variety of recovery options to satisfy any SLAs, as well as a proven track record of continuous innovation, built on top of a strong foundation of happy customers. Imagine a product release where users are literally giddy to get their hands-on code versus “let someone else QA it”.

Reason #5

This is taking too much of my time and resources.

With backup software, ease-of-use cannot be understated. So much so that “babysitting a backup” is a thing. Far too many products in this industry are hard to use and complicated. Kind of like the latest craze to substitute every meal with some ridiculous 14-ingredient protein shake. Good grief just eat a cheeseburger! But we digress…

Other solutions can do what you want, but only through scripting or the right level of PowerShell expertise. It doesn’t need to be that hard, and you shouldn’t have to build a workaround. You bought software to do that for you!

Another important factor is that your backup software needs to be able to evolve with you — like those adjustable pants we all secretly wish we were wearing for a big holiday meal. If adding a new NAS device or changing cloud storage requires you to change your data protection strategy, spend time re-educating IT staff or losing sleep about whether or not your IT team has the skills do to it successfully, you’re doing it wrong.

What you should expect from your next backup solution is the gift of time. Time back to work on other priorities, cut out of work early or actually use that vacation time that keeps piling up.

Questions to consider.

  • Stability: how often do you encounter stability issues with your current backup solution (bugs, job failures, etc.)?
  • Flexibility: what is your backup storage plan for the next three to five years, and how will data growth, cloud mobility and security risks alter that strategy?
  • Data reuse: you sit on a gold mine of business data within your backups — how are you putting that data to work for you to solve key business problems?
  • Backup/recovery speeds: as business demands for access to data continue to increase, are your RTOs and RPOs getting better, or have they plateaued? Where were they three to five years ago compared to now? Where would you like them to be?
  • Ease of use: how much time do you spend babysitting your backups? If that time was cut in half, what would you do with that extra time?
  • How is your company doing? What growth has your organization seen in the past month, year or quarter?

Conclusion.

By now, hopefully the why should be clear and the when equally so. (Hint: that’s now).

The how is up to you.

At Vault365, we believe our products provide unparalleled backup and recovery and would love for you to take them for a spin.

Our mission is to deliver a modern platform that can cover today’s backup needs, but more importantly can expand and adapt around whatever you’ll need in the future (cloud workloads, cloud mobility, Kubernetes, etc.)

Paradyn is a reseller for Vault365 , who specialize in Microsoft 365 Backup and Backup-as-as-Service. Would you like to discuss how Vault365 can help improve your current backup solution?  Click on the button below, fill out the form, and a Backup Expert will be in touch.

Talk to a Backup Expert

IT security is first priority when preparing for risk

Fergal Meehan, head of government relations, Paradyn

Paradyn’s methodology uses a traffic-light system to explain to the business how vulnerable it is to cyber attacks

 

Organisations today are increasingly aware of the threat from cyber criminals. How they respond to it, however, is changing, with a growing emphasis on risk management.

As IT has grown to become central to the operations of every organisation a threat has grown with it: not only are cyber attacks increasingly common, in today’s hyper-connected world, the consequences of a successful one are worse than ever. In response to this, ever more sophisticated security solutions are being deployed, including the use of active threat hunting and artificial intelligence.

Beyond the technology there has also been a wider transformation. Increasingly businesses are looking to assess their readiness from the perspective of managing risk – and turning to specialist managed service providers to assess the risks to which they are exposed in order to prepare for them.

Of course, risk cannot be measured if the IT estate itself is not understood, so making sense of what systems an organisation uses is an essential first step.

“What we do is gap analysis, CIS and NIST, analysing the business from an IT perspective,” Fergal Meehan, head of government relations at managed security specialists Paradyn, said.

Paradyn’s methodology uses a traffic-light system to explain to the business how vulnerable it is, and where its weaknesses lie.

“If there’s something like a phone system, for instance, it will be a red, amber or green, and we then ascertain what the risk is to the business if it is amber or red. That’s very important for explaining it to management,” he said.

Working with public sector clients, Meehan found these organisations were leaning more than ever into taking security seriously and were now ahead of some areas of the private sector.

“Procurement can be an issue. Public bodies tend to know what they want, but the procurement process can be difficult,” he said.

“Certainly, we’ve seen a lot of growth in awareness of security.”

First and last line of defence

With IT security, the mantra has long been that attacks are not so much a case of ‘if’ as of ‘when’. With that in mind, information security itself, important as it is, is not the only method of managing and mitigating risk.

Meehan said that alongside traditional security measures, any serious risk mitigation strategy will take backups very seriously indeed as getting an organisation back up and running after a problem or breach is one of the most crucial tasks.

“A lot of the time it comes down to backups. You can have all of the systems and hardware in place, but at the end of the day the key defence is the backup,” he said.

This does not mean that security is less important, and Meehan advocates a ‘zero trust’ model that starts at the device. It is a case of acknowledging the reality of the growing threat and ever-widening attack surface.

“There is no such thing as being risk free, so what’s the next best thing? Well, to have good, good backups. Ransomware is one of the best-known threats

Backups themselves can be, and often are, a target too, and so they need to be unalterable. If they are not, then attackers can encrypt them meaning a business will not be able to get up and running again after an attack.

“[We do] off-site backups, which links into the space around disaster recovery. We airgap the backups, creating immutability. This means you have a read-only version of the backups, so they themselves are protected from the threat of ransomware,” he said.

Working with a managed service provider, businesses can set recovery time objectives and recovery point objectives, as well as a comprehensive service level agreement. After this, however, they should not just sit back and relax. In order to ensure that they actually work when they are called upon, back-ups need to be tested.

“It’s important that you do your tests, and if you don’t have the expertise in house your service provider can do it for you. You do get customers who prefer to do it themselves as it means they don’t have their eggs in one basket: they have the backup as a managed service but they do their own testing in-house,” Meehan said.

Of course, one reason to have a managed service provider perform regular testing might be because an organisation has no internal IT team. Another, however, might be that the IT team is already overworked just keeping the lights on, and this is precisely when the risk of a breach will be at its highest.

“Even those that have IT departments are so stretched these days, particularly with cybersecurity,” Meehan said.

Click here to discuss your backup requirements in more detail.

Paradyn delivers cloud back-up to over 20,000 Microsoft365 accounts

Cybersecurity expert implements watertight back-up solution for Microsoft365 data

 

Company data is one of the most crucial elements of any business, but are you keeping yours secure enough? Data is facing ever-evolving threats such as deletion, corruption and ransomware attacks, and companies need to ensure that it is secured, compliant and quickly recoverable.

Do you know that backing up your Microsoft365 (M365) cloud data is your responsibility? Paradyn can help you to protect your entire M365 environment across Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, OneDrive for Business and Microsoft Teams, with a cloud solution including automated back-ups and full data restoration.

Innovative back-up technology

Data hosted at Paradyn’s secure Irish-based data centres together with innovative Veeam back-up technology ensures no downtime for customers in the event of an incident, enables speedy disaster recovery, and eliminates data loss. All customers have access to a self-service portal where they can carry out information recovery and restores, in cases of accidental or malicious deletion. Paradyn can also restore any data that has been deleted.

Without back-up for Office 365, you have limited access to and control of your own data. You can fall victim to retention policy gaps, data loss dangers and open yourself up to serious internal and external security risks, as well as regulatory exposure. Paradyn’s solution can help to protect your critical data and ensure business continuity.

Paradyn is one of Ireland’s leading cybersecurity service providers, with a security-first approach to implementation, monitoring and ongoing support. Its team of highly trained network and security consultants deliver best-in-class advice and support, enabling customers to reduce their cyber risk and focus on delivering their core business activities.

Click here to discuss your backup requirements in more detail.

Compliance is key in the world of data

Paul Casey, chief operations officer at Paradyn: ‘We need to make sure and constantly verify that we’re still allowing the right people access to the right areas and no more and no less than that.’

 

Four years have passed since GDPR came into play and from it both challenges and the knowledge facing privacy are increasing

It’s easy to forget the panic surrounding GDPR before its introduction in May 2018, which forced organisations to treat data with the seriousness and care it deserves.

Four years later, its influence has been greatly felt in how businesses deal with data and their responsibilities, much to the point where data breaches and fines regularly appear in the news.

“What it’s done is it put the concept of personal information to the forefront of every business owner’s mind,” Paul Casey, chief operations officer at Paradyn, said. “You should be thinking about it early in the process; it should be in the initial planning phases.”

“There’s probably more of a focus on data protection with cases appearing in the news. At least once a month, there’s some new headline and that is solidifying that this is the standard and it’s here to stay.”

Casey brings up an interesting point that while GDPR has been around since 2018, the pandemic happening two years later changed the landscape.

With all workers moving off-premises and many likely staying that way into the future, either as fully remote or a hybrid model, data protection is now more complex than before. Now the onus is on protecting data in different locations like the cloud.

“If they’re working from home, there’s so much between where they are and your organisation’s data,” he said. “You have to make sure you can verify it’s the right person from the right location getting to the data and not somebody else in-between.”

It’s why practices like zero trust – which requires all users to be authenticated, authorised and continuously validated for security before being granted or keeping access to data, no matter where they are in an organisation’s network – are becoming so popular. The boundaries separating organisations and access have disappeared completely.

“A lot of organisations are putting in the components of a zero-trust architecture without having that as a strategic end goal,” he said. “They did that to cover the risk of employees at home, verifying that it’s still that person.”

“We need to make sure we put those divisions in place and the previous IT infrastructure idea of the corporate networks being your castle where everyone inside is safe and trusted and everyone outside are the bad guys, that’s long gone.

“We need to consider people behind the walls as much as those outside it are working for the bad guys and we need to make sure and constantly verify that we’re still allowing the right people access to the right areas and no more and no less than that.”

Focusing on ensuring all of these things are covered is more difficult when considering the global skills shortage in cybersecurity. Having a dedicated team in-house is a luxury only major multinationals can afford, so for most organisations, outsourcing security is the only way.

It’s why services like Paradyn SOC and SIEM are growing in popularity, but as Casey mentions, many don’t know where to start.

The good news is that there are cybersecurity frameworks to base your protections on, such as ISO 27001. They can help break down your responsibilities and requirements into more manageable chunks so you can assess where your blind spots are.

“When you look at it from a holistic, big picture side, it gives an IT manager or director of IT a roadmap on what to do,” he said. “It’s all measured out, there are milestones, KPIs, and they can show that the organisation’s security posture is going in the right direction.”

“If you’re not operating on one of these frameworks, it ends up being piecemeal and you won’t be aware of the gaps in these projects you’re running.”

The benefit of that framework and measuring it is that you have something tangible to show those at board level about the effects of your security measures. By presenting it in a way that they understand, it makes it easier to show how vital security is to the organisation.

There is further scope for encouragement with the EU organisation ENISA (the European Union Agency for Cybersecurity), which is trialling certification for cloud products ensuring that they’re up to a certain standard.

Similar to the standard ISO 27001 provides, it will give further confidence that organisations are treating data with the protection and care it deserves and is expected to come into play in 2023.

“It’s good to see this evolution because they’ve seen we’re missing a spot there,” Casey said. “They said, what can we do to validate and express confidence in these cloud environments, where all of our data is held at the moment?”

“If you look at cybersecurity budgets – and it isn’t necessarily an IT function, it’s an organisational function – there’s a big portion of that which relies on IT doing what it needs to do to protect where the data is.”

“They’ve almost all come together in a line to emphasise organisations’ responsibilities to protect the data. Whether it’s on-premise or in the cloud, paper or digital, personal data or additional bits, you protect it with the same best practices.”

Click here to discuss your GDPR requirements in more detail.

Taking Security to the next level with visibility a key element

Fergal Meehan – Head of Government relations at Paradyn

 

As attack surfaces evolve and change thanks to a new way of working, new security frameworks like SASE are rising to the challenge.

With the development of the past few years, as remote working is now part and parcel of many businesses, tracking everything you need to protect is a greater challenge than ever. With the average worker using multiple devices to log into the same accounts, there’s a greater impetus to track what’s on the network.

That means the attack surface for the average company is now more expansive than ever and requires the approach to education, technology and policies to be updated and expanded. Not to mention other concerns as highlighted by Fergal Meehan, head of Government relations at Paradyn.

“The tools and technology are out there, but it’s knowing how to position it, remediate concerns and figure it out in a cost-effective manner,” he said.

It’s why security frameworks like SASE (Secure Access Service Edge), which was originally coined by Gartner in 2019, are coming to the fore. In layman’s terms, SASE brings all security and connectivity tools and technology together into one single cloud-delivered solution.

Tools like DNS security, machine learning, data analytics and cloud-driven firewalls are all built into the same system, allowing you to connect users and deliver technology solutions that keep them secure.

Meehan sums up the benefits as allowing flexibility, reducing costs and enabling new digital business scenarios. In short, IT managers can adapt and tailor it around the everyday demands that a business and its departments have.

“We’re in an era where every business unit in an organisation survives on IT,” he added. “SASE works off the zero trust model and brings elements like full-content inspection, allowing you to integrate with your SASE solution.”

The critical component throughout all of this is visibility. As Meehan mentions, you can have all the technology solutions in the world, but if you don’t know what you’re protecting or see what’s covered, they’re not going to be effective.

Zero trust is where this process starts and creating an itinerary of devices connected to the network, your IT architecture, and similar assets is the first step to knowing what to protect.

With SASE, you can see everything with full identity awareness. Regardless of where a person is logging in, you have the relevant information needed for your business to stay safe, including what applications they’re using.

That visibility also brings an unintended benefit that is important to good security posture: reporting. Whether it’s daily, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly or in-between, having reports gives your company an extra level of awareness that can only benefit them in the long run.

This heightened awareness is beneficial, but it’s only good if you have the necessary measures to mitigate an attack, something companies can tend to forget about until a zero-day exploit happens.

“The technology is there to monitor so you’re aware of your inventory and where it’s at with updates, but it’s getting that reporting back down to the desk of the person responsible,” he said.

“Once you normalise that, it brings another checkpoint where you can decide to move from quarterly patch management to bi-weekly because these updates made you aware of what’s required.”

While protection is important, giving the business the necessary breathing space to operate in is also required.

For most IT managers, the challenge is finding the middle ground between protection and accessibility, and the good news is that more tasks like patch management are automated, taking away much of the regular heavy lifting.

Having all these security measures is pointless unless you have a suitable mitigation strategy, with back-ups being a key element of this strategy. Paradyn itself practice this through its service Vault365, which leverages the cloud to back up an organisation’s Office 365 infrastructure. As long as you’re aware that you need to protect the data in the cloud, you will have peace of mind.

Taking such measures isn’t just for convenience; it also meets compliance and data protection requirements. Showing your work goes a long way to reassuring auditors, stakeholders and customers that you’re handling data responsibly.

“At the end of the day, it’s to get to a point where all you need is an executive report saying these tasks are successfully completed, that you’re now in this state, and you can tick these boxes around compliance and data protection,” Meehan said.

Click here to discuss your security requirements in more detail.

Paradyn invests €500,000 in new Vault365 backup service

Cillian McCarthy, CEO, Paradyn and Pat Downing, Commercial Director, Vault365

Vault365 is a brand-new backup solution for data stored on premise and in cloud applications, including Microsoft 365

Paradyn, one of Ireland’s leading cybersecurity service providers, is today announcing it has invested €500,000 in the launch of Vault365, a brand-new all-in-one backup, ransomware and data protection solution for data stored on premise and in cloud applications, including Microsoft 365. The solution has been designed to enable the fastest data restore in the industry.

The company forecasts revenues of €750,000 in 2023 following the launch and is creating five new jobs over the next 18 months. Initially available for Irish-based customers, Vault365 plans to roll out their backup services in the UK within the next six months.

As Office 365 will only retain data for up to 90 days, Vault365 securely backs up and eliminates the risk of data loss on Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, OneDrive for Business and Microsoft Teams. The easily-managed solution, which includes a Backup-as-a-Service (BaaS) option, also protects physical servers, virtual servers, cloud and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) applications such as Salesforce. Businesses can leverage powerful search tools, fast and flexible recovery, and export options to perform eDiscovery across their entire backup environment.

All data is securely hosted at Vault365’s Irish-based data centres. This ensures local access to data if needed and minimal downtime in the event of an incident, with speedy disaster recovery enabled. Should any incident occur, including a ransomware attack, customers can quickly recover data with the fastest data restore in the industry. Customers also have control over their own data with secure and easy-to-use portal access.

Vault365 is hiring in the areas of sales and support to meet customer demand for increased data backup and security in an ever-evolving IT landscape. The company will be engaging with customers across private and public sectors.

Businesses can avail of a 30-day free trial of backup for Office365 following the launch of the new service.

Cillian McCarthy, CEO, Paradyn: “Proactively protecting data has never been more important in a world where security risks are higher than ever. We are one of a few Irish companies offering this service, which we’re launching to meet customers’ increasing backup and security needs for their mission critical data, regardless of where it is.. There is a common misconception that backup is included with Microsoft, and a solution like this is crucial for businesses to avoid irreparable loss or theft of their Office 365 data.

“Our engineers are experts in their fields, and Vault365 enables business continuity which, in turn, offers peace of mind to customers. We are also excited to make the solution available to our UK customers within the next six months. With Vault365, data is always protected and accessible in today’s uncertain technology landscape.”

Click here to discuss your backup requirements in more detail.

First things first in security

Paradyn COO – Paul Casey

Cyber crime as a service is the new reality, and businesses need to fight back with better defences. They can start by getting back to basics.

Remote working. Previously unknown exploits. Phishing. Smishing. Ransomware. Compliance. It’s a cliché to call the internet the Wild West, perhaps even an insult to the denizens of the old West, but the reality is that businesses today are under extreme pressure to ward off cyber attacks.

Businesses know this, but the question is: do they know how to respond to it?

“There is, I think, a recognition that the threat landscape has changed,” Paul Casey, chief operations officer at network IT and service management solutions company Paradyn, said. Legislation has had an impact, of course, notably the EU’s general data protection regulation (GDPR), which has lit a fire under companies that hold or process customers’ personal data.

“Following on from the likes of GDPR there is a lot more compliance among medium and small enterprises. Of course, large pharma, banking and governments were already used to a level of compliance,” he said.

Casey said that one of the important aspects of GDPR was that companies had to not only do the right thing, but demonstrate good faith. Insurers, too, want to see the right policies in place, otherwise they may adjust rates or even remove cover. “Even from an insurance perspective, businesses are looking to demonstrate that they’ve done the right thing,” he said.

Clearly, then, the pressure is on. There are methodologies out there, though, that can help, notably from the Centre for Internet Security (CIS) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), adherence to which can give businesses confidence that they are doing things right.

“Were doing a lot with CIS controls. There’s another one, NIST, and there’s also ISO 27001. They all work in similar ways: what they do is allow an organisation to examine and understand everything they do.” Casey said that adherence to these standards led to what he called ‘security hygiene’. “Cyber security hygiene is like personal hygiene: you will be more prone to infection if you are not looking after hygiene,” he said.

Despite the whirlwind of change, businesses have a responsibility to themselves and to their customers, one that is increasingly present in law. “The boundaries have all moved, but the fact is you still have to control things. You need to find out where you’re doing well and where you’re not and work from there,” he said. “That’s where the frameworks come in.”

The goal is a different way of thinking about security, one that means stepping back from saying ‘right, I need another box with lights on it’ and instead looking at the data, systems and network that run a business. ‘It’s really not about putting another box in,” he said.

In fact, businesses often trip up on basic measures including things such as patching and updates. The threat from this seemingly trivial fault is very real indeed and businesses may find they are entirely exposed as a result, especially as so-called ‘zero day’, or novel, exploits are on the rise. “The Chrome browser has had 12 zero day exploits this year alone,” said Casey.

In any case, businesses need to get the basics right before they can move on to more complex measures. As a result, auditing processes is at the top of Paradyn’s list of crucial steps to take in the fight to protect its clients from online criminals.

“If your processes aren’t right, if your users aren’t being trained, and your users on-boarded and off-boarded correctly, then there is a problem. These are things that organisations need to think about and it requires a formalised approach,” he said.

Casey said he is not arguing there is no requirement for new technology, however.

“There are next generation tools with the capability to mitigate against new threats, but if those tools are not implemented in the right way you’re not going to get maximum benefits or, if it’s particularly badly done, you’re leaving yourself open,” he said.

Paradyn also helps to produce reports for internal teams or for businesses own cyber security teams, helping to ease the burden on often already stretched IT staff. “Keeping on top of everything that is changing – the Windows 11 rollout, all of your ongoing projects – is a difficult job as it stands,” Casey said.

But keeping on top of things is essential. A recent report in trade newspaper Computing indicated that it is not only legitimate businesses that are leaning on service providers: strange as it sounds, hackers are now offering criminal gangs ‘exploit as a service’. As a result, the only possible response is to seek external help to fight off the growing threat.

“There’s a massive demand for security services,” Casey said. Little wonder.

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